Posted by: on August 19, 2016 at 3:22 pm

computer-old

Human age: 482

Earlier today we posted a fun little link to our Facebook and Twitter: How old is your computer in human years?

Here are some quick results:

  • 1 year old computer = approximately 19 human years
  • 3 year old computer = approximately 56 human years
  • 5 year old computer = approximately 93 human years!
“Ok, that was fun. What does it matter for my small business?”

Newer computers generally run faster and are less “glitchy” than older ones. If higher productivity, lower maintenance costs, less downtime, better security, faster service and lower energy bills sound good to you, then replacing an old computer might make more sense than ever.

We wrote about four good reasons to upgrade computers over three years old in a previous blog post:

  • Older PCs break down more often and cost 1.5 more times to maintain when compared to newer PCs.
  • New computers experience 40% less downtime than older ones.
  • Security incidents decrease by 23%, on average, with a new PC versus an old one.
  • The processors that we recommend, Intel Core i5 and i7, allow us to repair your desktop even if it is powered down, letting us get you back up and working even faster.
So, is the link accurate?

We dug around the internet a bit, looking for the origins and rationale of the original site. We didn’t find any background specifically related to that particular site, but estimates ranged from 15 to 20 years. That correlates pretty well with the link results above.

In our estimation, it holds up pretty well. A computer 1-3 years old with proper maintenance should be running strong. After 3 years, it’s generally time to come up with a computer retirement plan. Running a 5-year-old computer in your workplace should be an amusing anomaly at best. (Our apologies to any 93-year-old humans who are still working full time.)

Give it a try with the oldest computer in your office, and let us know your results on Facebook or Twitter!

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